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Second Class Summer

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2023) Permanent link
Jenna Bradberry

Hello all!

This summer was by far one of my favorites that I have had! As a 2/c, I had three weeks of leave right after the spring semester ended. I went home to Indiana to visit family and friends and just relax after a long semester. When I came back, I was thrown right into the summer session comprised of 11 more weeks, doing something different each week! This is what made the summer so fun and unique. These weeks consisted of the Mid-Cadet Transition Course, Rules of the Road and Test, Cyber, Prep (for swab summer), T-Boats, CATP (Aviation Program), Range, Coastal Sail, and 3 weeks of CADRE SUMMER. Cadre summer was some of the most rewarding, tiring, and fun weeks I have ever had in my life. It truly is such an amazing experience to be able to take full responsibility for the training of swabs and watch them grow under your care as you train them. As a phase 2 cadre, I had the opportunity to lead the swabs to the finish line and end of swab summer, which was amazing to say the least. Next to cadre, I had a lot of fun during range week as I had the chance to qualify on the pistol. I also loved, loved, LOVED, the aviation program. For one week I got to spend time at Air Station Cape Cod and experience everything about flight. I got to fly (literally fly) a CASA and hang out the back as they did a drop flight as well. This was such a cool experience! I wanted to fly before, but this really made me want to fly even more that’s for sure! If you would like to know more or any specifics about my summer or cadet life in general, feel free to contact me! The summers are by far the best here at USCGA!

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Summer Snapshot

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Eagle, Class of 2024) Permanent link
Isabel Jimenez

And so here we are, the end of summer. 😊 I can say that it’s been a wild ride. As for the end of 4/c semester, I did end up passing all my classes. Which to some, that’s not a big deal. But for ME, I was quite surprised and very much enthralled at how the grades turned out. Needless to say, I did learn a few things…

One, try not to overdo your commitments. I learned that the hard way. I love to help, but sometimes I do spread myself too thin. While it kind of worked out in high school, it led to a much more stressful semester. Second, it’s okay not to have everything figured out. While that’s the mindset you might come in with, just realize that many aspects in your life change. Friends, family, and just your environment. That’s when you learn to let go of what you cannot control.

As for my summer, this is how it rolled. The first half of the summer I was on Eagle. As soon as I finished my finals, I got on to “America’s Tall Ship” and sailed across the ocean. The first two weeks we learned many skills including how to handle lines, stay on watch, and complete qualifications. While not all of it was ideal, I have certainly learned much. Our first stop was in Azores, Portugal. I loved going into the churches because of the beautiful artwork – and the town had amazing gelato. Hands-down; it was so good. I may never taste that exact same gelato again, but I will forever remember it. (Insert two more weeks of sea-going time here.) Our second stop was in Reykjavik, Iceland. While I didn’t quite get to explore as much as I hoped, I got to take some pictures of the volcano on the tour bus on our way to the planes. We took an international flight home, and that was it for that adventure.

As for the second half of the summer, I took summer school. While a lot of people try to advert from summer school, it all depends on the person. I struggle in school, so I am not going to lie – I did also struggle in summer school. But I can say, you do get a lot more focused attention during the summer, and a lot more personalized help in the classes. I took Engineering Mechanics – Statics & Calc II, and I did pass both classes. Although…during the process I did change my major to Government for a good handful of reasons. And while I would love to share all the reasons, I’m going to save that for another story…

So here we are. I got to go home after the whole ordeal and spent a few weeks with family – I loved it. I’ll be heading back to USCGA as a 3/c; with more responsibility & a handful of excitement. We’ll see how the school year turns out, but I’m sure it will turn out as God Wills it. Until I reach out again, off to the next salty sailors’ tale!!!

Feel free to reach out with any questions @ [email protected]. I’m always happy to share an adventure. 😊

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Advice for Applying, BEST Thing about the Academy

(Choosing the Academy, Class of 2022) Permanent link
Erin Edwards

This week I asked the underclassmen in my company to share their best advice while it is fresh on their mind. We're talking about Swab Summer, tips for the application process, the things they're most looking forward to and MORE!


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Hurricanes and Ambulances

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2024) Permanent link
Cheyenne Waters

Now this is not your typical worst first day of school that involves mean kids, strict teachers, and funny mishaps. This is quite extreme when it comes to college experiences.

So, the week started off with a hurricane. The hurricane barreled into New London on Sunday which, of course, cut our weekend short and locked the cadets up in Chase Hall. Believe it or not, the hurricane was one of the best parts of the week. Even though I was stuck in Chase, I found ways to keep myself busy by preparing for school and creating study tools and sessions for the 4/c.

Tuesday was the first day of classes. I woke up early on Tuesday excited to start school and especially excited for my oceans lab where I would be studying meteorology. I get an email advertising for a blood drive later that day. I sign up on a whim thinking I had a free period, it was a nice thing to do, and, if I am being honest, it was also a good bullet. So, my first class went great, and my spirits were high as I headed to Leamy to give blood. I had never donated blood, but I had my blood drawn loads of times, and I was not fazed by needles or blood. Therefore, I walked into Leamy thinking it would be no big deal. I was very wrong. I got there at 11:00 and waited for about an hour. I figured I would miss lunch, but I had a good breakfast, and I was drinking my water while waiting. Plus, all the times I had my blood drawn I was just fine after a cookie and some juice.

I finally get to the table, feeling slightly nervous but ready to finish and get to class. They stick me, which was not that bad, then the blood starts flowing. The machines beeps were the first sign something was wrong. The blood sucker machine kept saying my blood was moving really slow. So, they give me something to roll in my hand and it flowed a little faster. However, it still ends up taking forever to make a pint. Almost four time longer than usual!

At this point, I really want to get to lab. The whole process had taken way longer than I thought it would. So, I quickly stuff some food in my bag and start off to class. I don’t make it very far before my head spins and my vision blurs. I walk back to the Red Cross people, and they have me lie down. Now I did not actually pass out. I just got very close. I hazily emailed my teacher to tell her where I was. I tried to sit up, but I felt so dizzy that they made me lay back down. Finally, the head Red Cross lady said she was going to call Nine-One-One. Now, I start to panic in earnest. I felt terrible, but I thought an ambulance was a bit dramatic. I really just wanted to go to the clinic. I also wanted to sit up because my panic was making my breath tight. Someone from the clinic arrives, but they call the ambulance anyway.

The EMTs get there. They strap me to the transport bed thing, and we take off. The ride was actually pretty fun, and I guess the highlight of the day. After that, they stick me in the ER, and I wait a while. I eat and drink something and feel better, but when they take me back, they say I am still dehydrated, and they hook me up to an IV. The IV, of course, starts hurting when the bag gets about a three quarters empty. So, they take it out and send me on my way.

I get back to the Academy, tell my story about a dozen times (which was actually pretty fun since it was a traumatic but very interesting story). The next morning was pretty bad too. I missed another class because I was in the clinic. Then, I switched up my classes and missed yet another class. I got a lot of makeup work, but I made it through Wednesday with no more ER trips. After a bit of rest and relaxation and a couple of good nights sleeps, I felt back to one hundred percent.

So, I guess I should summarize the great lessons from my unfortunate first days of school. The first is basically bad things will happen. I mean it happens. Sometimes you just have to roll with it. The second is that sometimes you do need to take a pause. Sometimes it is just too much, and you need to take time to sleep, breath, relax, etc. The third is something you will hear at the academy a lot which is communicate and ask for help. Everyone here is very helpful and understanding if you give them the chance by communicating and asking for help. The last one is trying to find a silver lining. I will admit I was pretty down those two days. I had a lot of stress (but unfortunately not blood) pumping through me. However, I am trying to get back to my normal, happy self and look on the bright side. I can’t say you will be happy all the time at the academy. It’s just not true. BUT you will enjoy your time better here if you do your best to look at the positive no matter how hard things get.

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