Skip Navigation Links
APPLY | LOGIN | PERSONALIZE | PARENTS | PROSPECTIVE CADETS | VIRTUAL TOUR | ESPAÑOL | SEARCH
FacebookFlickrTwitterYou Tube
CADET LIFE
DAILY ROUTINE: Monday - Friday
This information is representative of a cadet experiences throughout a typical day. Please select from the times and images in the timeline below to learn more about daily life as a United States Coast Guard cadet.
  • Cantrell Reveille 

    0600: Reveille

    Sara Cantrell - Class of 2015


    To non‐military members, reveille may seem like a bunch of noise way too early in the morning, but for us, reveille marks the start of a new day. Every morning reveille is sounded as the commencing of a new day “officially” begins. Over Swab Summer, reveille replaced alarm clocks and every swab had to be out of their room before reveille had stopped. These 17 seconds created a stressful start to yet another day in the military. Reveille taught each swab the importance of being able to get up and be ready to go in any situation. I remember myself being abruptly woken up every morning by reveille sounding throughout the building, but it wasn’t until a few weeks passed when I understood the importance of it. During the academic year, reveille is not used to abruptly wake cadets up (although some do use it has an alarm clock) but is to remind us that with a new day comes responsibility and showing the core values of honor, respect, and devotion to duty throughout that day. Although it may seem that reveille is disregarded as it is a regular occurrence, it is still significant when we hear it every morning.


    Read Sara's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Martin Formation

    0620: Morning Formation/Breakfast

    Matthew Martin - Class of 2015


    We have formations every morning and afternoon in the quad for fair weather or in the hallways during foul weather. Formations are a time where you get to meet with your division and discuss what is going on with each other. It is where important information is passed and is an opportune time for inspections.

    Read Matt's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Chavarria-Aguilar Training

    0700: Military Training Period

    Alexis Chavarria‐Aguilar - Class of 2015


    Here at the Academy, there are certain times of the week that cadets are subject to military training. Although this concept may be strange to others, it is simply another responsibility for us. These military trainings exist in order to further enhance our professional development and prepare us to be leaders as commissioned officers. Each training lasts for an hour and can occur in the morning or evening; however, never twice a day. Morning trainings are from 0700 until 0800, while evening trainings occur from 1900 until 2000. These times are convenient, as they do not interfere with any other cadet obligations. The topics of our military trainings range from operational lessons, alcohol awareness, finance management, and even informative updates about the fleet.

     

    In this instance, cadets enjoy a question and answer session with retired Coast Guard CAPT Daniel C. Burbank who was serving as flight commander onboard the International Space Station on Expedition 30, which began several months previous. Cadets had the opportunity to video chat CAPT Burbank during his mission and discuss his experiences in space.

    Read Alexis' ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Keith LOB

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Jordan Keith - Class of 2014


    I am taking an Organizational Behavior and Leadership class and learning different ways to interact with others. The education received in this class was useful in the summer as my classmates and I took on the role of cadre and assist the incoming class on the beginning of their journey into becoming Leaders of Character.

    Read Jordan's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Yin Golf

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Carol Yin - Class of 2014


    Every semester, cadets take a fitness/wellness class to stay in shape, learn about healthy living, or promote a well-balanced life. One semester of 3/c year is dedicated to racquetball and golf, lifetime sports that will be beneficial to a cadet’s career in and outside the Coast Guard. In my opinion, the golf course is a corporate off-site where leadership meetings, business ideas, and social events take place. As Coast Guard officers, golf will be an integral part of our leadership and social development. Before this, the only experience I had under my belt was putt putt golf at my local family fun center. I had the misconception that golf was for “old” people, and I was intimidated by the neatly mowed green with 18 random holes strewn about the grounds. However, I did not realize what I had been missing for over 20 years of my life. Golf three days per week has been one of the most fun and valuable classes I have taken at the Academy because it is a skill I can take with me wherever I go. In two short months, I have learned to chip, drive, pitch, and (properly) putt a golf ball. Also, this is a sport where one does not need to be a great golfer to play. All one needs is knowledge, awareness, confidence, and courage to play.

    Read Carol's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Martin Literature

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Matthew Martin - Class of 2015


    In Literature class, we discuss the reading we had for homework or our next assignment, but every once in a while we get to do some acting and bring the literature to life. This makes the class more fun and the reading more interesting.

    Read Matt's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Nolan Spanish

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Stephen Nolan - Class of 2013


    The Academy offers a wide variety of elective courses and encourages students to branch out into different areas. As a Marine and Environmental Sciences major, I don’t typically spend a lot of time in Satterlee Hall, where the Humanities department is, but when it came time for me to take electives, I chose to continue my education in Spanish.The Spanish classes offered at the Academy range from beginner level for individuals who have never before been exposed to the language, to fluent speakers wishing to expand their grasp of grammar, to a course specifically designed to aid future officers in learning Coast Guard terminology in a foreign language. It’s honestly one of my favorite classes at the Academy because its fun and different from the other major-specific courses.

    Read Stephen's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Townsend Dynamics

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Brianna Townsend - Class of 2014


    As a civil Engineering major, one of my required courses is Dynamics. This class incorporates particle motion, rigid body motion and vibrations. It is very useful for some of my other courses too because it very applicable to all of my science and math-based courses. I personally like this class a lot because it something that I have never learned before and it always interesting to stretch mind in a different way and think outside of the box.

    Read Brianna's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Patron Ships

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Jennifer Patron - Class of 2014


    In my Ships and Maritime System class, we presented the various types of vessels we learned about throughout the semester. My group presented naval combatant vessels. In our presentation we covered environmental impacts, regulations, as well as overall structure and stability of naval destroyers specifically. The goals of these presentations are to educate our classmates of the details of different vessels such as bulk carriers, container ships, LNG, and cruise ships. Furthermore, it helps us better identify these ships while out at sea.

    Read Jennifer's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Ward CJ

    0800‐1150: Morning Classes

    Jessica Ward - Class of 2013


    The Coast Guard falls under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), which is the basis for all military justice systems. Many people may not realize it, but when you join the military you can be tried under a totally separate system than the civilian system. There are different levels of disciplinary action, each for different levels of infraction with different punishments available. Like the civilian counterpart, the Coast Guard and all military services have their own lawyers who are knowledgeable in the minute details of the system. Some Academy graduates will go on to be these lawyers. Not everyone, however, is cut out to be a lawyer. Still, all cadets are required to take Criminal Justice and write an investigation for a mock case at the end of the semester. This is to familiarize us with the different components and the varied “levels” of punishment from administrative action to general courts martial. When we graduate, it is very likely we will have to write an investigation and recommend which actions to take, so it is important to be familiar with the UCMJ. Although the material may be boring at times, it makes watching movies like a “Few Good Men” more interesting.

    Read Jessica's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Subramanian Wardroom

    12:05 Noon Formation/Lunch

    Kevin Subramanian - Class of 2015


    Eating in the wardroom at the Academy is a great time to learn about the rest of the corps and recent events. The entire Corps of Cadets eats at the same time every Monday through Friday, giving everybody a chance to catch up with one another and encourage the support Bears sports teams. Public announcements during meals are a great chance to gain public speaking skills, because there are no tougher critics than your own peers!

    Read Kevin's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Kekoa Navigation

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Kody Kekoa - Class of 2015


    If not for my Fundamentals of Navigation class, I would surely suffer as an officer in the Coast Guard. To prepare us for our future, my instructors assign hours of meticulous work for my classmates and me. Due to the amount of plotting, charting, and graphing, my navigation homework has become a new hobby of mine. This class is great because I gain nautical knowledge, which directly applies to working in the fleet.

    Read Kody's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Kane Tennis

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Julie Kane - Class of 2013


    Every cadet takes lifetime sports classes, including golf, racquetball, and tennis. This past semester, I had tennis. Twice a week my class met down at the tennis courts overlooking the Thames River to learn tennis rules and techniques. Once we learned the basic skills that we needed, we played each other in doubles matches. Even though I will not be playing in the Wimbledon anytime soon, tennis has been a great stress reliever during the school day and we had a lot of fun.

    Read Julie's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Min Leadership

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Alex Min - Class of 2015


    Leaders in U.S. History is one of my favorite classes. The class covers the shaping of American Freedom from the first colonies up until present day. Through numerous different article sources and two designated books, Professor Zuczek sums all the information up and helps us grasp the meaning of freedom and how it has evolved.

    Read Alex's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Quintero Physics

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Carlos Quintero - Class of 2014


    Taking Physics II gives us the opportunity to think critically to solve abstract problems. The course deals with electric and magnetic fields, which you can not physically see. Most classes we apply what we learn in class and do a lab to reinforce concepts. Putting the things we've learned in class to work in the lab helps to understand the concepts. The good thing about the Academy is that since all of my classmates are taking Physics II, if I ever need help understanding the information, there are a lot of people to ask.

    Read Carlos' ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Subramanian Wellness

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Kevin Subramanian - Class of 2015


    Principles of Fitness and Wellness is a class that is very important to our professional training. We learn about the exercise and nutrition goals of the Coast Guard, and we are expected to bring them to our units when we are in the fleet. Like other health classes, we work out, make meal plans, and learn about human anatomy in order to improve our health and the health of others.

    Read Kevin's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Chavarria-Aguilar PD

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Alexis Chavarria-Aguilar - Class of 2015


    During the second semester of my fourth class year, I took Personal Defense I with Coach Ulysses Grant. The class was held twice a week, and revolves around basic self defense techniques. The class involved various forms of martial arts, teaching cadets how to quickly disable an attacker, and how to effectively use time and space. Our Personal Defense class is also a great workout and has also helped me develop a newfound confidence in my ability to defend myself.

    Read Alexis' ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Townsend Navigation

    1300-1540: Afternoon Classes

    Brianna Townsend - Class of 2014


    This is not your typical college course, but Applications in Navigation has to be one of the most useful courses that you take while at the Academy. We learn how to use maneuvering boards to determine wind speed and the actions that other ships will take, and how it will affect your boat. We also work with charts by making corrections on them. tracking a course, and at the end of the semester we present a Navigation Brief on a transit through a harbor. This course correlates directly to the missions of the Coast Guard in the practice of safe boating. It is extremely useful and a very exciting class to take.

    Read Brianna's ongoing cadet blog. 

  •  Ward Rowing

    1600-1800: Athletic Period

    Jessica Ward - Class of 2013


    For those of you who don’t know, rowing is a fall and spring sport, although some people only row for one season each year. The fall season involves longer races that are 5K in length and include the famous Head of the Charles. Every 10 seconds or so a boat begins the race, thus the races are against the clock and the results compared afterwards. The spring season is comprised of “sprint” 2K races. For these races, the boats all line up and race simultaneously next to each other (which is much more exciting). The Academy generally rows eights, which means there are eight rowers and one coxswain in each boat. Like most of the rowers at the Academy, I walked onto the rowing team with absolutely no experience. It’s been an interesting journey.

     

    Rowing is a sport that brings its own mental and physical challenges. All of the other sports I have ever played have been ball-centric (soccer, basketball, volleyball), which require thinking on your feet, anticipation, stop-and-go sprinting, cutting, etc. Rowing is the same motion over and over again in unison with seven other people while balancing in a narrow boat. It sounds almost mindless, but it requires constant focus. In my own way, I have grown to really enjoy the challenge of it. Plus, since you row backwards, you get the added joy of seeing your opponents as you beat them. I came to the Academy because I wanted to be challenged, and rowing has definitely been a part of it. Last year, myself and another 2/c were elected co-Captains for this year. Had someone told me in high school that I would be elected as captain of a sports team I would have been surprised, but the Academy has helped me grow in ways I couldn't have imagined. If anyone is looking for a sport when they come to the Academy, check out rowing. If you like challenges, it just might be for you.

    Read Jessica's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Kekoa Boxing

    1600-1800: Athletic Period

    Kody Kekoa - Class of 2015


    Anytime you can escape the hectic world of the Academy is a good time, and aside from exploring all that New London has to offer, my escape is boxing. In this experience, I have learned more about myself and my limits. I work to continuously expand them. This sport has brought many opportunities, including, traveling to different states, meeting many people, and boxing in front of large crowds. Like boxing, sports at the Academy are a great way to release stress and raise morale and teamwork within the corps.

    Read Kody's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Townsend Dance

    1600-1800: Athletic Period

    Brianna Townsend - Class of 2014


    There is nothing better than spending time with your best friends while doing something that you love. That is exactly what dance team is like. It is exceptionally exciting to be on the sidelines at every football game cheering for our team, and boosting the morale of the corps. I have made so many new friends on the dance team as well because we all have a common passion of dancing.

    Read Brianna's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Chavarria-Aguilar Wardroom

    1700-1900: Evening Meal

    Alexis Chavarria-Aguilar - Class of 2015


    During the rigorous routine of the day, cadets are pushed to their limits from sunup to sundown. Amidst the grueling demands of the day, there exists one thing that cadets have nothing to worry about – three square meals. In the Chase Hall wardroom, cadets are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner each and every day. Our meals are prepared and served by Aramark, an organization that has been recognized by FORTUNE magazine as one of the world’s most admired companies.

     

    Breakfast and lunch are carried out in a “family style” fashion, in which cadets sit with their division and are served by our beloved, hardworking “wardroom ladies.” Dinner, on the other hand, occurs in more relaxed setting, in which cadets have from 1700 until 1900 to select food from the buffet line. Once again, our wardroom staff is absolutely spectacular and will go out of their way to help you with anything you need.

    Read Alexis' ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Kane Sustainabilty

    1900-2000: Activity Hour

    Julie Kane - Class of 2013


    One of the Coast Guard's missions is environmental protection, so it's important that we try to be as sustainable as possible at the Academy. One of the ways that cadets can get involved in environmental issues is through the Sustainability Club. We've teamed up with the National Wildlife Federation to build nesting boxes for roseate terns on Faulkner Island. The club has brought in numerous speakers and groups to talk about environmental issues. Some members of the club purchased reusable coffee mugs so that we don't generate as much waste in the wardroom. Sustainability Club is a great way to become involved in protecting the environment and changing the way we do things at the Academy to conserve resources.

    Read Julie's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Yin Bowling

    1900-2000: Activity Hour

    Carol Yin - Class of 2014


    The Academy offers numerous outlets for cadets to have fun through sponsored morale events, the cadet lounge which has a pool table, a Wii, and two flat screen TVs, and best of all, the bowling alley! Open for free on Friday and Tuesday nights to cadets, the bowling alley is a relaxing environment where cadets can relieve stress and have a good time without leaving campus. Recently, during Eclipse Week, a week-long event that brings officers and community members to the Academy to discuss cultural diversity at the Academy and in the fleet, the Genesis Council sponsored a Cadet-Officer Bowling Challenge. This allowed for cadets and officers to interact in a relaxed and fun environment while also gaining advice about the fleet and life. I had the opportunity to participate in the Cadet-Officer Bowling Challenge and also meet numerous officers who voluntarily came back to the Academy to interact with cadets and give useful advice. During the bowling challenge, I met CDR Pruitt, the current CO of CGC Dauntless, home ported in Galveston, Texas. We initially began talking because we were on opposing teams, but soon our rivalry quickly shifted to that of amiability and mentorship. He offered sound advice on graduate school programs and how an engineering degree will set me up for the future. The bowling alley, cadet lounge, and Dry Dock are always my outlet whenever I need a break from schoolwork or just want a place to hang out outside of Chase Hall. I have learned to find a balance between studying and having fun on campus. Work hard, play hard!

    Read Carol's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Nolan Choir

    1900-2000: Activity Hour

    Steven Nolan - Class of 2013


    The United States Coast Guard Academy is indeed a military institution, as is evident to anyone who looks at it, but it also celebrates its extracurricular activities. In particular, there are quite a few different choral departments for those who wish to get involved. I personally am actively involved in the Catholic Choir. We get together twice a week, once on Wednesday evenings and once on Sunday mornings to practice and then perform hymns at the Catholic Mass every week. The wonderful thing about Catholic Choir is that it allows people to get together outside of classes and outside of Mass to meet with people of the same faith, to sing some good music and just share some time together. It’s one of the highlights of my week.

    Read Stephen's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Cantrell Writing

    2000-2200: Evening Study Period

    Sara Cantrell - Class of 2015


    The John and Erna Hewitt Writing and Reading Center is a great learning environment for any and all cadets at the United States Coast Guard Academy. The writing center is located on the upper deck of the library (Waesche Hall) where there is a beautiful and peaceful view that allows for quiet studying with or without an instructor. All cadets have access to the writing center’s website where we can set up appointments with teachers to look over papers in any subject or help us to get started with the writing process.

     

    The writing center has great hours and there is always a teacher willing and able to help. One great thing I like about the writing center is its open until ten o’clock pm on the weekends. I personally like to go over Sunday night so that I can fix anything on my paper before a busy and hectic week begins. The writing center allows cadets to choose the subject they will be discussing so that an instructor who is familiar with the subject area will be available. Most of the time I already have my paper written and the instructor will help me with structure, organization, and grammar but a couple of times I have gone in looking for assistance on how to start writing my paper. The writing center helps with the writing process and revision to create an overall exceptional product.

    Read Sara's ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Quintero Studying

    2000-2200: Evening Study Period

    Carlos Quintero - Class of 2014


    Following dinner is generally the time cadets begin doing their homework or the projects assigned to them. This generally goes on until 2200 or 2400 depending on how much was assigned. For the most part cadets get together and help each other with homework, and it is common to snack or listen to music to make a less stressful environment.

    Read Carlos' ongoing cadet blog.  

  • Ward Taps

    2200: Taps

    Jessica Ward - Class of 2013


    Every night at 2200, the speakers throughout Chase Hall play Taps. Taps is played on a bugle and it is performed at funerals, memorial services, and at the end of the day. If you are in the passageway at this time you immediately stand at attention. Although its origin is not fully known, there are multiple myths and stories surrounding its creation. Regardless, the purpose of Taps is to signify the close of the day and to remember the sacrifices others have made before you. Although it is just a bugle playing, there are verses associated with it. The first, and most common one is as follows: Day is done, gone the sun, From the lakes, from the hills, from the sky, All is well, safely rest, God is nigh. Taps is that daily reminder of the bigger picture for the Coast Guard and nation in the past and present.

    Read Jessica's ongoing cadet blog. 

  • Andreasen Evening Report

    2400: Evening Reports

    Brooklyn Andreasen - Class of 2013


    First class cadets are responsible for acting as Officer of the Day (OOD) as part of their military obligations at the Coast Guard Academy. They are in charge of their designated company and ensure the good order and discipline of the wing area. They will go on a round once every hour to inspect the company, account for missing cadets, report to the company’s command staff, take evening report (to make sure all cadets are in Chase Hall or accounted for), and attend to any additional duties while sitting at the official OOD desk. At 2200, right after Taps plays, the OOD will secure the lights.

     

    At the end of the evening, 2400, the OOD will turn in their evening report to the Regimental Cadet Duty Officer (RCDO), which accounts for where cadets are if not in Chase Hall. Many cadets will still be at work in academic buildings on homework and projects. The OOD notes where these cadets are so that they are not counted as missing. This photo depicts 1/c Austin English (Men’s Lacrosse Captain) standing a taut watch as the Echo Company OOD and me dutifully signing ‘in for the night’ (IFN).

    Read Brooklyn's ongoing cadet blog.