Skip Navigation Links
APPLY | LOGIN | PERSONALIZE | PARENTS | PROSPECTIVE CADETS | VIRTUAL TOUR | ESPAÑOL | SEARCH
FacebookFlickrTwitterYou Tube
ACADEMICS
CDR Keith Shuley
CONTACT INFORMATION
CDR Keith J. Shuley
U.S. Coast Guard Academy
Command Religious Program
15 Mohegan Avenue
New London, CT 06320

Keith.J.Shuley@uscg.mil
(860) 444‐8480
CDR KEITH J. SHULEY, CHC, USN
Chaplain Corps, U.S. Navy
Chaplain
U.S. Coast Guard Academy

Chaplain Shuley was born in 1958 in Boston, Massachusetts. He graduated from Barnstable High School in Hyannis, Massachusetts in 1976. He received his A.A. from St. Thomas Junior College in Bloomfield, Connecticut (now closed) in 1978 and his B.A. in 1980 from University of Hartford. He did his graduate work in Boston at St. John’s School of Theology where received his M. Div. degree in 1984. 

During a sabbatical following his academic studies, Chaplain Shuley worked for one of the companies owned by Anheuser Busch, and then enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1987. Chaplain Shuley completed his active duty enlistment in 1991. 

He then returned from sabbatical to begin his pastoral internship in Corpus Christi, Texas. He was ordained a Deacon in 1991 and a Priest in 1992. 

He was commissioned shortly after ordination and went directly to Navy Chaplain School. Following Chaplain School, Chaplain Shuley served in parish churches in the Corpus Christi area while also serving as a Chaplain in the Navy Reserve. 

Chaplain Shuley returned to active duty in 1995. He has served in Naples, Italy with the U.S. Navy personnel assigned to NATO, he was assigned to a Marine Expeditionary Unit in Okinawa, Japan, he served the Coast Guard at TRACEN Petaluma, and returned to Okinawa where he served with 3D Medical Battalion. Chaplain Shuley then was the Command Chaplain on board USS Peleliu LHA 5, with additional duties as Chaplain for Expeditionary Strike Group ONE. 

He then went on an isolated duty tour in Diego Garcia, Indian Ocean, and had a short assignment to U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, when the needs of the Navy sent him back to the USMC, to serve with 1st Marine Logistics Group, where he had two combat deployments in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following his USMC tour, he returned to sea as Command Chaplain for USS Carl Vinson CVN 70, with additional duties as Chaplain for Carrier Strike Group ONE. 

Chaplain Shuley arrived at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in July, 2012. 

Chaplain Shuley’s personal awards include two Meritorious Service Medals, a Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Secretary of Transportation 9-11 Medal, four Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, a U.S. Coast Guard Commendation Medal with “O” device, a Joint Service Achievement Medal, a U.S. Coast Guard Achievement Medal, a Military Service Outstanding Volunteer Medal, a U.S. Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, and numerous unit awards. 

Among his personal qualifications include the Fleet Marine Force Qualified Officer (Chaplain) pin and the Fleet Marine Force Ribbon, no longer awarded, but still authorized for wear. He seldom wears anything other than his top row and his pin. 

Chaplain Shuley was among the U.S. Coast Guard Chaplains recognized by the Military Chaplains Association in 2002 who were awarded the organization’s Chaplain of the Year Award for 2001 in connection with their service at the World Trade Center site and the Pentagon immediately following 9-11. Then Commandant ADM Loy nominated the Chaplain Emergency Response Team (CERT) Members for the award. 

He is considered an “Honorary SWO" (Surface Warfare Officer) for his countless hours on the bridge and an “Honorary Aviator” for his 1,000+ hours as a passenger, mostly on the “Holy Helo.” 

Chaplain Shuley’s widowed mother, Claudette, is his dependent, with ID card, decal, and base privileges. He is the oldest of four siblings. 

His late father, Walter, was a BM3 in the Navy Reserve during the early years of his life, and passed away in 2000. 

Chaplain Shuley’s hobbies include PT, spectator sports, classic cars, community radio, and music of the late 50’s to the early 90’s. Try to avoid starting a conversation with him on any of those topics if you are in a hurry.