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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2013
  • Evans Thumb 
  • Earle Thumb 
  • Emerson Thumb 
  • Riley Thumb 
  • Davis Thumb 
  • Thompson Thumb 
  • Walton Thumb 
  • Underwood Thumb 
  • Langlois Thumb 
  • McMeekin Thumb 
  • Evans Photo

    Stephen H. Evans

    Captain
    Class of 1927

    Legion of Merit (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of service to the Government of the United States as an Atlantic Fleet Escort Commander engaged in escort of trans-Atlantic Convoys during the Second World War from June 18 to December 2, 1943. As an Atlantic Fleet Task Group Commander, Captain (then Commander) Evans conducted the escort operations with utmost skill and success despite the hazards of enemy submarine-infested waters and adverse weather, resulting in the transportation of men and supplies to sustain the Allied War Fronts in Europe and thereby contributing materially to the prosecution and winning of the war. His judgment, skill, and performance of duty reflect great credit upon Captain Evans and the United States Naval Service.

     

    Captain Evans later served as the Commander, Coast Guard District Fourteen, and subsequently served as Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy before retiring at the rank of Rear Admiral. (Download pdf) 

  • Earle Photo

    William K. Earle

    Captain
    Class of 1940

    For service as set forth in the following summary of action:

     

    For meritorious service on 16 October 1956 in rescuing every person aboard Pan American Clipper 10943, while Commanding Officer of the Pontchartrain on patrol at Ocean Station November, after receiving an emergency call from the Clipper stating that one of her engines was running away. The plane requested continuous radio-beacon service, and later announced her intention to ditch alongside Pontchartrain. Ditching procedures worked with textbook precision, marking a safe ditch heading with fire-fighting and the Clipper’s tail section was severed from the main body within three minutes of impact on the sea. Pontchartrain quickly maneuvered into position and removed the twenty four passengers and seven crew-members in less than twenty minutes before the aircraft sank. The seamanship, teamwork and rescue techniques performed with efficiency are commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Captain Earle continued his seagoing career, later assuming the role as Head of Professional Studies at the Coast Guard Academy and Commanding Officer of USCG Barque Eagle. Upon retirement, Captain Earle continued to influence the Coast Guard by serving as Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Editor of The Bulletin. The Annual Cadet Creative Writing Contest is named in his honor. (Download pdf) 

  • Emerson Photo

    Robert E. Emerson

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1943

    Silver Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Boat Group Commander of the U.S.S. Leonard Wood during the amphibious invasion of enemy Japanese-held Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, from February 17 to 22, 1944. Carrying out three separate attacks under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant (then Lieutenant, Junior Grade) Emerson expertly directed the landing boats in his charge and, by his initiative and sound judgment, was largely responsible for efficient traffic control and boat salvage, thereby contributing materially to the success of the operation. His skill, leadership and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Emerson retired at the rank of Captain following his final assignment as the Coast Guard Seventeenth District Chief of Staff. (Download pdf) 

  • Riley Photo

    Francis X. Riley

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1943

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service as Commanding Officer of an LCL(L), engaged in salvage operations during and subsequent to the invasion of the coast of France, June 6, 1944. Skilled and courageous in the performance of an extremely hazardous assignment, Lieutenant Riley efficiently directed the activities of his ship in rendering all possible aid to wrecked craft and, persevering in his valiant efforts in the face of heavy enemy shellfire and in an extremely heavy sea, enabled numerous of the vital units to rejoin the assault. On sighting two barges loaded with ammunition and drifting toward St. Marcouf Island on June 9, he immediately proceeded to secure them, thereby removing a serious danger to shipping and craft and making available much needed ammunition to the Army. By his professional ability, initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Lieutenant Riley contributed materially to the success of the assault and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Riley retired at the rank of Captain following his final assignment as Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Base New York. (Download pdf) 

  • Davis Photo

    John S. Davis

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1961

    Navy and Marine Corps Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For heroism while serving as a pilot of HU-16E on 19 April 1968, Lieutenant Davis landed in the semiprotected waters between Panay and Catanduanes Islands, Republic of the Philippines to evacuate the Executive Officer of the USS MAURY (ACS 16). Upon departure, the doctor on board the aircraft specified that the flight should proceed at the minimum altitude possible due to the critical intestinal block of the Executive Officer. This was accomplished through a hazardous unfamiliar mountain range by utilizing the river valleys and gullies. Lieutenant Davis’ superior demonstration of professionalism and airmanship, resulted in the possible saving of a life and were keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Davis retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Thompson Photo

    Kenneth W. Thompson

    Commander
    Class of 1964

    Meritorious Unit Commendation

    For service as set forth in the following summary of action:

     

    For meritorious service on 11 October 1982 while serving as Commanding Officer of CGC Vigorous in rescuing survivors of the capsized sailing vessel Gonzo. While proceeding to avoid a severe storm, Vigorous was diverted to the Gonzo through the weather. The first vessel on-scene was the 870 foot tanker California Getty who was unable to retrieve the three persons but remained until the arrival of Vigorous, who was vectored to the scene by a Coast Guard C-130 and Canadian P-3 aircraft. Winds of forty knots and seas of twenty feet forced recovery on the forecastle using a “horse collar” from the deployed helicopter. With the California Getty stationed up-sea to create a lee, Vigorous positioned herself upwind and drifted down on Gonzo. While the horse collar was being streamed, Vigorous backed down slightly, allowing Gonzo to slip under the stem. Each Gonzo crewmember donned the horse collar, jumped into the sea and was quickly hauled aboard the Vigorous, and they were all safe within thirty-nine minutes. The outstanding professional seamanship, teamwork and innovative rescue techniques performed under extremely arduous and demanding conditions by Vigorous are most highly commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander Thompson went on to retire at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Walton Photo

    Richard W. Walton

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1965

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while serving with U.S. Naval Forces, Vietnam, as Commanding Officer, USCGC Point Grey. Lieutenant Junior Grade Walton engaged in the interdiction of a Communist insurgent resupply ship on 1 March 1968. He contributed very significantly to driving the enemy vessel ashore resulting in its subsequent self-destruction. His magnificent use of his vessel’s weaponry resulted in numerous hits on the armed enemy ship, the suppression of return fire and interdiction of enemy attempts to off-load the cargo, which consisted of at least 650 small arms and large quantities of heavy caliber, automatic weapon and small arms ammunition. The subsequent capture of this cargo deprived the Communist insurgents of sorely needed arms and ammunition. Lieutenant Junior Grade Walton’s courage under fire, superb ship handling, and outstanding leadership were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Junior Grade Walton retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Underwood Photo

    Gerald L. Underwood

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1966

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong communist aggressors in the Republic of Vietnam from October 1968 to October 1969. Lieutenant Junior Grade Underwood served as Commanding Officer, United States Coast Guard Cutter Point Banks. His aggressive leadership and mature judgment made his ship a highly effective Operation MARKET TIME unit, compiling an impressive record in carrying out all phases of coastal patrol and enabling his unit to suppress enemy fire on numerous occasions and inflict substantial losses on the enemy while sustaining neither material damage nor personnel casualties to his own unit. He was also instrumental in improving the material condition of his craft and maintaining morale at a high level. Lieutenant Junior Grade Underwood’s exemplary professionalism and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Junior Grade Underwood retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Langlois Photo

    Paul A. Langlois

    Commander
    Class of 1976

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the night of 12 February 1997 while serving as aircraft commander of the Coast Guard HH-65A helicopter, CGNR 6589. The aircrew was engaged in the rescue of two people from the dismasted, disabled sailing vessel Gale Runner taking on water off the Washington Coast. Commander Langlois flew the helicopter over 85 miles solely on instruments, radar, and his copilot’s night vision goggles, in adverse weather conditions. After he was diverted to briefly search for a Coast Guard motor lifeboat also dispatched to assist the Gale Runner, he was directed to return to rescue the persons aboard the Gale Runner, now in imminent danger of grounding on rocks. Commander Langlois navigated the helicopter between the sea stacks, and located the vessel but was unable to safely use the helicopter’s Hover Augmentation System and the rescue basket until he repositioned over the vessel to safely hoist the victims. He landed the helicopter at Station Quillayute River and directed the search efforts for the missing motor lifeboat crew. Commander Langlois’ actions, aeronautical skill, and valor were instrumental in the rescue of two people. His courage, judgment, and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander Langlois retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • McMeekin Photo

    William F. McMeekin

    Commander
    Class of 1982

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the Coast Guard HH-60Js from 27 August to 02 September 2005. On 27 August, Commander McMeekin flew into winds of excess of 75 knots near the eye of Hurricane Katrina to provide rescue support and communications for CG 6019 who rescued three persons from the disabled fishing vessel Mary Lynn. Afterwards, he located the F/V Maria Rita in distress and rescued its sole fisherman. At midnight on 29 August, Commander McMeekin flew through the outer bands of Hurricane Katrina to reach the flood zones in New Orleans and assist the survivors of the storm as one of the first responders. Commander McMeekin flew over 25 hours and conducted 56 hoists. During the night of 30 August, Commander McMeekin expertly maneuvered the helicopter into an obstructed parking area, and flew CG 6017 to an adjacent position to deliver over one thousand pounds of critical emergency medical supplies and paramedics to Tulane University Hospital. Commander McMeekin fought crew fatigue, 300 foot cloud ceilings, and limited visibility to expertly hoist and transport an additional 43 distraught hurricane victims from rooftops to safe havens, rescuing 55 storm victims in all. His courage, judgment, and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander McMeekin retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf)