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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2006
  • Carl Von Paulsen thumb 
  • Richard Fuller thumb 
  • Billy Ryan thumb 
  • James Doughty thumb 
  • Donald Prince thumb 
  • Lance Eagan thumb 
  • Richard Butchka thumb 
  • James White thumb 
  • Joseph Angelico thumb 
  • Robert Williams thumb 
  • Donald Estes thumb 
  • Thomas Ostebo thumb 
  • Carl Von Paulsen photo

    Carl C. Von Paulsen

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1913

    Gold Lifesaving Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Summary:

     

    Around 11:30 AM on 1 January 1933, The Coast Guard Air Station at Miami, Fl received a request for assistance from the Chester shoals Coast Guard Station. A man named Paul Long had been blown offshore in a skiff just inside Cape Canaveral at 10:00 pm the previous night. The Arcturus, piloted by LCDR Von Paulsen, proceeded to Cape Canaveral through rainy, squally weather. The Arcturus circled widely looking for the craft, but saw none. The crew lightened the plane by dumping the surplus fuel. A landing was made on a sea whose waves were at least 12 feet high, twice as high as the seaplane was designed to land upon. Impact with the water caused the lift wing tip float struts to collapse, leaving the float banging against the wing. All the men were ordered to ride on the wing in an extremely precarious position, in an attempt to maintain an even keel. At times they became semi-conscious from inhaling gasoline and tetrachloride fumes. An attempt was made to take off, but it was found to be impossible to keep the damaged wing level. A second landing was made that wrinkled the hull under the forward spar. An unsuccessful effort was made to taxi to shore. The engines were then stopped and the sea anchor was pulled out. The sea anchor line was carried away and the anchor lost. After an SOS call had been sent out another anchor was improvised and a pole antenna was rigged. The plane then continued to drift until 1:00 am when it was passed through three lines of surf and beached inside of Bethel Shoal. The crew went ashore and were shortly afterward located by U.S. Customs Border patrolmen.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Von Paulsen was a Coast Guard aviation pioneer and an accomplished Cutterman. Lieutenant Commander Von Paulsen retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Richard Fuller photo

    Richard L. Fuller

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1943

    Navy and Marine Corps Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For heroic conduct while assisting in rescue operations of Army and Coast Guard personnel, stranded on the Greenland Ice Cap, from December 4, 1942, to May 8, 1943. Despite the intense cold, high winds, and treacherous ice, Ensign Fuller with four men volunteered to remain at the Comanche Bay Beach Head Station in order to carry on rescue operations for the personnel of an Army plane and to locate a wrecked Coast Guard plane. Pushing on over the Ice Cap to within six miles of the marooned aviators, he was compelled to turn back when confronted by impassable crevasses. After several valiant attempts to reach the stranded Army and Coast Guard fliers, Ensign Fuller, his feet frozen by the intense cold, finally was forced to return to his station and later, was evacuated. His initiative, endurance and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Junior Grade Fuller retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Billy Ryan photo

    Billy R. Ryan

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1943

    Bronze Star (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For heroic achievement as Boat Group Commander, attached to the U.S.S. Leonard Wood, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Saipan, Marianas Islands, from June 15 to 24, 1944. Untiring in the performance of duty, Lieutenant (then Lieutenant Junior Grade) Ryan capably directed and supervised the landing of personnel and supplies under heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire. Although authorized by his superior officer to leave the vicinity because of the intensity of enemy fire, he voluntarily remained to attempt the rescue of a crew of five men from a landing craft stranded on a reed which was under direct enemy fire and, after the rescue, worked two more hours to salvage the boat. In addition, he volunteered to test enemy fire in order to determine whether enemy guns had been neutralized, taking his boat through the channel where hostile guns opened fire upon him. His skill, courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Ryan retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • James Doughty photo

    James I. Doughty

    Commander
    Class of 1954

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on March 12, 1968 as aircraft commander of a Coast Guard HH52-A helicopter engaged in the evacuation of nine crewmen from the floating oil rig Julie Ann, Dixilyn No. 8, located 110 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, in the Gulf of Mexico. Despite severe weather conditions with 40-knot winds, 20-foot seas and blowing spray which constantly threatened to extinguish the aircraft’s engine, Commander Doughty skillfully maneuvered the helicopter and hovered close aboard the sinking rig with his rotor blades less than 10-feet from the superstructure. Although occasional monstrous swells racked the rig even closer to the hovering helicopter, Commander Doughty persevered, and with the utmost precision successfully hoisted five survivors, off-loaded them on a nearby stationary oil rig platform and returned to the pounding rig to pick up the last four men. Under the same arduous conditions, further compounded by increased in the hoist area, Commander Doughty quickly moved in and out of the area until the last man was removed from peril. With the stationary rig already crowded and his fuel state approaching a minimum, he proceeded directly to shore with the last survivors. Commander Doughty displayed expert airmanship and dauntless valor throughout this perilous mission. His aeronautical skill, courage, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander Doughty retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Donald Prince photo

    Donald L. Prince

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1956

    Air Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious achievement in aerial flight on December 22, 1964 while serving as pilot of a Coast Guard helicopter engaged in the rescue of persons stranded by the flooding Eel River in Northern California. The helicopter departed the San Francisco Air Station and proceeded to the Humboldt Bay area, approximately 200 miles north, in response to a report that 16 persons were stranded on an island. Lieutenant Commander Prince, then Lieutenant, under extremely adverse weather conditions in mountainous country, skillfully piloted his aircraft to the scene, and upon arrival, rescued 10 persons at Cock Robin Island before the lack of fuel forced him to proceed to Arcata Airport. After refueling, he immediately returned to the flooded area and resumed rescue operations. As darkness set in, Lieutenant Commander Prince hoisted two adults and a child to safety. On his next flight, he hoisted three more persons from the flooded area. However, while attempting to land them safely at Arcata Airport, the helicopter crashed, killing all on board. Lieutenant Commander Prince’s fine airmanship contributed to the safe rescue of 13 persons from peril. His initiative, skill, courage and unwavering devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Prince was killed in the line of duty. (Download pdf) 

  • Lance Eagan photo

    Lance A. Eagan

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1962

    Silver Star

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Lance A. Eagan distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Rescue Crew Commander of an HH-3E helicopter in Southeast Asia on 2 July 1968. On that date, Lieutenant Eagan penetrated a heavily defended area of North Vietnam to attempt the rescue of an injured downed pilot after three helicopters had previously been severely damaged and driven off by the intense, hostile ground fire. Despite intense accurately directed hostile anti-aircraft fire, Lieutenant Eagan, with undaunted determination, indomitable courage and professional skill established a hover and deployed a pararescueman to assist the injured airman. Disregarding the fusillade of hostile fire that originated from beneath his hovering helicopter, Lieutenant Eagan maintained a stable hover until the downed pilot and pararescueman were safely recovered from the hostile area. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Eagan reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Eagan retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Richard Butchka photo

    Richard V. Butchka

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1964

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    Lieutenant Richard V. Butchka distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight as Aircraft Commander of a HH-3E helicopter in Southeast Asia on 24 October 1969. On that date, in the face of known hostile forces, who had just shot down another rescue helicopter, Lieutenant Butchka, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, skillfully and expeditiously effected the rescue of three crewmen from the downed helicopter. The outstanding heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Butchka reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Butchka retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • James White photo

    James A. White

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1965

    Bronze Star (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Summary:

     

    For courageous actions while leading a small boat operation off of the coast of Vietnam during November 1968. This small boat operation was a psyops (psychological operations) up a canal to visit areas of questionable Viet Cong activity. Lieutenant (junior grade) White was serving as patrol commander in the lead boat, a 14-foot Boston Whaler, when it came under heavy enemy fire from six different concealed locations. The initial volley of fire hit Lieutenant (junior grade) White’s boat and severely wounded the machine gun operator who was located just to Lieutenant (junior grade) White’s right and damaged his M-60 machine gun. Initially, Lieutenant (junior grade) White began firing his M-79 grenade launcher in order to suppress the enemy’s fire. He then took the machine gun, cleared the weapon, restored it to operation and continued firing at a variety of enemy positions. Lieutenant (junior grade) White also called the USCGC Point White and asked that the Point White put some 81 mm mortar rounds along the canal banks as both boats left the area. Once clear of the area, Lieutenant (junior grade) White administered first aid to his wounded machine gun operator. Lieutenant (junior grade) White and another of his boat crew received minor wounds although his machine gun operator was severely wounded. Lieutenant (junior grade) White’s actions were credited with saving the lives of six others in both small boats.

     

    Lieutenant (junior grade) White retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Joseph Angelico photo

    Joseph F. Angelico

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1967

    Bronze Star (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong communist aggressors in the Republic of Vietnam from September 1969 to August 1970. While serving as Commanding Officer of United States Coast Guard Cutters Point Jefferson and Point Marone, Lieutenant (junior grade) Angelico conducted combat patrols in conjunction with Operation MARKET TIME. During those patrols, he boarded and searched numerous junks and sampans and detained 43 Viet Cong suspects. He also directed sixty-eight naval gunfire support missions which inflicted substantial damage to numerous enemy sampans and structures. While engaged with the enemy, he directed suppressive fire which silenced the enemy attacks without suffering friendly casualties. He distinguished himself by his untiring efforts and imagination in training a Vietnamese crew to take over the Point Jefferson. His efforts in denying the coastal waterways to the Viet Cong significantly contributed to the United States efforts in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant (junior grade) Angelico’s exemplary professionalism, sense of responsibility and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant (junior grade) Angelico retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Robert Williams photo

    Robert E. Williams

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1967

    Bronze Star (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong communist aggressors in the Republic of Vietnam from October 1969 to August 1970. While serving as Commanding Officer of the United States Coast Guard Cutters Point Welcome, Point Dume and Point Orient, Lieutenant (junior grade) Williams performed MARKET TIME patrols in the South China Sea. His aggressive leadership, initiative and sound judgment made his vessels effective combat units which carried out all phases of MARKET TIME operations. During those patrols, he boarded and searched numerous junks and sampans and detained twelve of those in addition to apprehending seventy-seven Viet Cong suspects. He consistently pursued the enemy and inflicted heavy losses on them during eighteen naval gunfire support missions which resulted in damage to numerous bunkers. On three occasions, Lieutenant (junior grade) Williams provided emergency naval gunfire support for Coastal Group Sixteen when it was threatened by Viet Cong troops. In addition to his boats’ outstanding readiness posture, he provided frequent logistical support for coastal groups and naval support activity detachments along the I Corps Tactical Zone coast. After being transferred to Coast Guard Division Thirteen, he served as Chief Staff Officer and continued his outstanding performance during the final phase down of the division. Lieutenant (junior grade) Williams’ professionalism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant (junior grade) Williams retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Donald Estes photo

    Donald E. Estes

    Commander
    Class of 1971

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Commander Estes is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the morning of 22 September 1990. As aircraft commander of Coast Guard helicopter HH-3F CGNR 1467, Commander Estes launched his aircraft to determine the source of an Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) signal near Cordova, Alaska. Flying at 100 feet through heavy rain showers, gale force winds gusting to 75 knots, severe turbulence, 30-foot seas, and visibility less than one quarter mile, Commander Estes was further hindered by inaccurate readings from the aircraft’s direction-finding systems, which were soon determined to be the result of two separate EPRIB signals. Upon arriving on scene and locating the burning hull of the F/V Janice N, no survivors were visible. Commander Estes immediately began several exhaustive search patterns for signs of survivors in the water. Finally, after two and one half hours, with fuel running low and visibility reduced to one-eighth of mile, the aircrew sighted a raft with three persons onboard. Undaunted, Commander Estes maintained a hovering position for 40 minutes, despite severe weather, communications malfunctions, and a critical fuel shortage. With no visual references, three extremely demanding hoists were completed to recover the survivors, who were then delivered to Cordova for medical treatment. Commander Estes’ actions, aeronautical skill, and valor were instrumental in the rescue of three victims. His courage, judgment, and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander Estes retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Thomas Ostebo photo

    Thomas P. Ostebo

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1981

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Ostebo is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the morning of 30 July 1989. While serving as pilot of Coast Guard HH-3F CGNR 1495, he was engaged in the rescue of five people from an airplane crash on the Chilkat Peninsula near Haines, Alaska. Dispatched from Coast Guard Air Station Sitka, Lieutenant Ostebo piloted CGNR 1495 through mountainous terrain, with severely reduced ceilings and visibility, to the base of a 1,500-foot mountain obscured in clouds. Despite dense fog, heavy rain and only 20 feet of visibility, Lieutenant Ostebo expertly hovered the helicopter up to the 800-foot level of the near vertical mountainside, keeping only the tree tops in sight while homing on radio signals from a civilian helicopter hovering near the crash site. After two attempts to reach the scene while compensating for a malfunctioning attitude indicator and radar, Lieutenant Ostebo located the crash site and established a 125-foot hover among the treetops. Meanwhile, two aircrew members were lowered through the dense trees to remove the survivors from the aircraft wreckage. Lieutenant Ostebo hovered above the scene in dense fog for 2 hours while nine demanding hoists were completed, despite repeated difficulties with the rescue basket becoming entangled in the trees. After the survivors were safely onboard, Lieutenant Ostebo conducted an instrument takeoff into the thick clouds while surrounded by 6,000-foot mountains. Once clear of the terrain, he descended below the cloud cover to visual conditions. After quickly refueling in Haines, Alaska, Lieutenant Ostebo flew CGNR 1495 to Juneau where the survivors were transferred to awaiting ambulances. Lieutenant Ostebo’s actions, aeronautical skill and valor were instrumental in the rescue of five critically injured victims. His courage, judgment and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Captain Ostebo remains on active duty and has been selected for promotion to Rear Admiral (lower half). (Download pdf)