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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2006
  • Arthur Hesford thumb 
  • Carl Peterson thumb 
  • Robert Long thumb 
  • Herbert Lynch thumb 
  • Mark Welliver thumb 
  • William Bickford thumb 
  • Robert Workman thumb 
  • Harry Obedin thumb 
  • Arthur Hesford photo

    Arthur J. Hesford

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1930

    Silver Lifesaving Medal - x2

    For service as set forth in the following Summaries:

    While assigned in USCGC Tahoe, during a late evening walk along the pier, Lieutenant Hesford saw three apparently intoxicated yachtsmen proceeding ahead of him. Noticing a few seconds later that there were only two yachtsmen, Lieutenant Hesford ran up to the men. He found a hole in the pier and immediately began taking off his shoes and trousers to rescue the drowning yachtsman. Jumping into the dark water under the pier, he was able to successfully find the man and pull him to safety. Due to his vigilance, sound thinking and selflessness, Lieutenant Hesford saved the yachtsman’s life.

     

    On May 10th, 1937, Lieutenant Hesford received word of a capsized boat which was drifting off of Ocean Beach toward the sea. Due to a recent storm, lifeboats from nearby stations were forced to return as the breakers capsized their boats with each attempt. Lieutenant Hesford, as copilot of the RD-4 Douglas Dolphin, spotted two young boys clinging to the capsized boat just outside of the breakers. The RD-4 Douglas Dolphin landed in the violent sea and was able to reach the boys by drifting to them. Lieutenant Hesford was on the wing of the RD-4, passed a line to the boys, and hauled them in safely. The seas were too dangerous for the RD-4 to take off, and so they spent an hour and a half taxiing in to safe waters. The two young boys were successfully rescued due to the courage and determination displayed by Lieutenant Hesford. (Download pdf) 

  • Carl Peterson photo

    Carl U. Peterson

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1930

    Legion of Merit and Purple Heart

    For service as set forth in the following Summary:

    Lieutenant Commander Peterson, Commanding Officer of USCGC Escanaba, was posthumously awarded for his valiant efforts in rescuing the crew of the Dorchester on the night of 3 February 1943. The Escanaba was en route from Newfoundland to Greenland, serving as the escort to the U.S. Army transport Dorchester. Around 0100 on 3 February 1943, a torpedo struck the Dorchester which had a total of 904 people on board. The ship sank in twenty minutes, exposing the soldiers and crew to 36 degrees Fahrenheit air temperature and 34 degrees Fahrenheit water temperature. The Escanaba initially went in search of the submarine only to find no trace of it. Prior to the tragedy of the Dorchester, Escanaba intensely studied its crew’s search and rescue techniques, trying to become more proficient in their efforts. As a result, Escanaba was training its crew using unique and original ideas for that time, such as using the aviator’s rubber exposure suits and employing rescue swimmers. As a result, the crew of Escanaba was able to rescue 133 survivors on that frigid and dark night. Lieutenant Commander Peterson and his crew selflessly sought out the members of the Dorchester for over eight exhausting hours.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Peterson died on June 10th, 1943 along with the rest of the crew of the Escanaba, save for two survivors. Dense smoke was seen rising from the ship while it was on convoy duty en route from Greenland to Newfoundland. The cause of the sinking of the Escanaba is not known. (Download pdf) 

  • Robert Long photo

    Robert B. Long Jr.

    Captain
    Class of 1946

    Bronze Star Medal (with Valor)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

    For meritorious service while serving as Commanding Officer in USCGC Campbell (WHEC-32) from 14 December 1967 to 12 August 1968 during combat operations against the enemy. Captain Long’s personal initiative and sustained performance, marked by skillful professionalism, effectively sustained his ship through five anti-infiltration patrols and fifteen Naval Gunfire Support missions. During these dangerous periods, his outstanding and aggressive leadership resulted in grave damage being inflicted upon enemy troops and installations. He led his crew in firing nearly two thousand rounds of ammunition against Communist forces, thereby contributing directly to the United States’ mission in Vietnam. Captain Long’s aggressive leadership and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  (Download the pdf) 

  • Herbert Lynch photo

    Herbert J. Lynch

    Captain
    Class of 1946

    Bronze Star Medal (with Valor)

    For service as set forth in the following Citations:

    For meritorious service in connection with operations involving conflict against the enemy forces in North Vietnam as Commanding Officer, USCGC Winona (WHEC 65). Captain Lynch displayed outstanding professionalism and decisiveness in countering the infiltration attempt of an enemy steel hulled, trawler type, supply ship off the coast of South Vietnam while on MARKET TIME patrol on the morning of 1 March 1968. Having skillfully shadowed the enemy ship for more than six hours Captain Lynch challenged the trawler after she had entered South Vietnamese waters and then promptly sank the vessel after the challenge had been answered by enemy fire. The destruction of the supply ship which was loaded with arms and munitions for the Viet Cong forces prevented these vitally needed materials from reaching enemy hands and was accomplished without serious damage to friendly units or personnel casualties. The quick initiative and professional conduct displayed by Captain Lynch were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    For meritorious service as Commanding Officer of USCGC Winona (WHEC-65) from 25 January to 29 June 1968 during combat operations against the enemy. Captain Lynch’s personal initiative and sustained performance marked by skillful professionalism, effectively sustained his ship through three anti-infiltration patrols and thirteen naval gunfire support missions, during which he fired 1,510 rounds of 5”/38 ammunition. His dedication to duty coupled with aggressive leadership guided the ship to an outstanding degree of reliability and performance and reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Services.

     

    Captain Lynch was later the 12th District Operations Officer and Chief of Staff, and retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Mark Welliver photo

    Mark Welliver II

    Captain
    Class of 1946

    Bronze Star Medal (with Valor)

    For service as set forth in the following Summary:

    Captain Mark Welliver II was awarded the Bronze Star for his courage and dedication as displayed as the Commanding Officer of the USCGC Spencer from 1968–1970. On 11 February, 1969, Spencer joined the Third Squadron off the waters of Vietnam. Captain Welliver II and his crew were involved in a mission to interdict Communist waterborne supply lines, entitled Operation MARKET TIME. During this operation, Spencer spent 70 percent of its time at sea, and cruised for almost 44,000 nautical miles. Spencer participated in 13 Naval gun fire missions which resulted in the destruction of more than 160 enemy structures. Under the adept leadership of Captain Welliver, Spencer detected 4,200, closely monitored 1,320, and interdicted 52 enemy suspects who were transferred to the custody of the South Vietnamese. On 30 September, 1969, Spencer returned for Governor’s Island, ending an extremely successful deployment under the leadership of Captain Welliver II. Captain Welliver was presented the Bronze Star by General Westmoreland, U.S. Army Chief of Staff and previous head of the Military Assistance Command in Vietnam.  (Download pdf) 

  • William Bickford photo

    William J. Bickford

    Captain
    Class of 1955

    Coast Guard Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

    Captain Bickford is cited for heroism on the morning of 5 April 1976 while en route from Juneau, Alaska to Ketchikan aboard a commercial airliner. During the landing at Ketchikan, the jetliner overran the end of the runway, plummeted into a ravine, broke into several pieces, ruptured her fuel tanks and burst into flames. As a result of his extensive service as a Coast Guard aviator, Captain Bickford, serving as the Seventeenth Coast Guard District Staff Inspector, had the keen foresight to mentally pre-plan his escape. Thus, upon final impact and without hesitation, he began the exodus of passengers through the forward cabin door. This effort was culminated by his assisting an injured stewardess from the burning aircraft and bodily carrying her across a stream of volatile jet fuel to a place of refuge. After assuring himself of the safety of the others, Captain Bickford returned to the cockpit area of the burning wreck to aid another Coast Guardsman in an attempt to free the trapped flight deck crew. Learning of possible survivors still remaining in the passenger cabin, Captain Bickford, his clothing soaked with fuel and with total disregard for his personal safety, courageously climbed back onto the wing and made a final search before leaving the aircraft. He then proceeded up a nearby hillside and directed the awaiting airport firefighting crew into action. This final decisive act undoubtedly retarded the spread of the conflagration sufficiently to permit others to successfully complete the rescue of the hapless flight deck drew prior to the aircraft becoming engulfed in flames. Captain Bickford demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of grave personal danger during this aircraft disaster. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. (Download pdf) 

  • Robert Workman photo 

    Robert B. Workman

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1959

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

    For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the night of January 27, 1967 as aircraft commander of a Coast Guard helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of four adults and two children from the vessel Cecil Anne which was sinking 120 miles northeast of St. Petersburg, Florida. Lieutenant Workman proceeded without fixed wing escort and made a night instrument “Beep to Hover” maneuver while hampered by darkness and obstructions from a 24 foot antenna and a 12 foot jack staff. Despite the vessel yawing as much as 60 degrees and the stern submerged, he skillfully maneuvered the helicopter crosswind to hoist the six persons, one with a broken leg, from the bow of the boat. Due to the total weight on board the last hoist required 100% power plus forward motion to remain airborne. Lieutenant Workman displayed expert airmanship and dauntless valor throughout this perilous rescue mission. His skill, courage, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. (Download pdf) 

  • Harry Obedin photo

    Harry Elis Obedin

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1960

    Coast Guard Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For heroic conduct on April 16-17, 1962, while serving as Executive Officer of the USCGC Travis (WSC-153), engaged in fighting a fire on board the Italian motor vessel Andrea Gritti, at Port Everglades, Florida. The Travis, which was moored in Port Everglades at the time, was called upon to render assistance to the Captain of the Port, Miami, and to the local civilian fire-fighting organizations when the Andrea Gritti entered the port with a cotton and resin fire smoldering in its No. 3 Hold. Shortly after his arrival at the scene, Lieutenant Obedin, then a Lieutenant (junior grade), found the fire had penetrated to the engine room. Further, the large quantities of water used in fighting the fire were causing the ship to take a heavy list to starboard, throwing the crew members into a state of panic and greatly hampering fire fighting and salvage operations. He organized and directed crew members of the Travis in containing and combating the engine room fires by use of foam, and his personnel succeeded in extinguishing the fire and keeping re-flashes under control for approximately 14 hours. Lieutenant Obedin also supervised cutting a hole in the side of the ship to assist in dewatering the holds, and he led a team of men in removing a manhole on a fuel settling tank in which the fuel was boiling. He then used portable CO2 extinguisher to cool the boiling fuel. Lieutenant Obedin demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of ever-present personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. (Download pdf)