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cadet blogs

Autumn in New England

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link   All Posts
Cannon Photo Well, it's the first day of fall in New London, Connecticut. I am going to miss the warm weather, summer nights, days at the lake, and so on and so forth. But despite not being the biggest fan of colder weather, I honestly have high hopes for this upcoming autumn/winter. You might ask, "But Colton, how in the world could you find enjoyment of the bitter New England cold where you aren't right down the road from the nearest Chick-Fil-A or Waffle House?" While that is definitely a valid question, there are plenty of upsides to the changing of seasons (despite being so far from Georgia). Autumn means a couple of things: bonfires, camping, corn mazes, pumpkin patches, THANKSGIVING, state fairs (I'll take a fried order of everything you have, please), college football games (WDE), dressing more formal is considered casual...and that is just off the top of my head. Probably one of the sweetest parts of the fall up here is a large-scale obstacle course I go to in Vermont each year. Not only is it eight to ten miles of variations of crawling, running, pull ups, and carrying heavy objects, but the changing color of the trees in the Vermont mountains is unbelievable. I guess you could say things are getting pretty serious...

 

The summer was pretty incredible though, don't get me wrong. Whether it was sailing around New England and spending the fourth of July in Nantucket (or was it Martha's Vineyard?), or training incoming swabs (easily the best part of my Academy experience so far), it was a time of non-stop adventure. I will say though that training the swabs with Lyme Disease was an interesting experience to say the least. If I were to yell at any point, I would be completely out of energy for the rest of the day. Despite that, it may have been a blessing in disguise. Since I was unable to yell and scream nonsense like cadre tend to resort to, I was forced to actually use leadership lessons and be one of the more approachable cadre when it came to classroom time with the swabs. I may have not instilled the fear of God in them, but I do believe that taking this alternative approach allowed me to truly gain respect from many of my swabs (now freshmen!!!), and we are all able to have healthy yet professional relationships to this day. I am thankful for all of the unforgettable experiences in my journey as a cadet so far, and anticipate the many more to come.

 

Go Bears Baseball!
Colton

 

More about Colton.