Skip Navigation Links
APPLY | LOGIN | CREATE AN ACCOUNT | PARENTS | PROSPECTIVE CADETS | VIRTUAL TOUR | ESPAÑOL | SEARCH
FacebookFlickrTwitterYou Tube
CADET BLOGS

cadet blogs

Fantastic April

(Just for Fun, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Cantrell Photo Another fantastic month has come and gone. It’s hard to believe with all of the schoolwork and military obligations that graduation is right around the corner. Only two and a half more weeks of school and we are in the final stretch to commencement. The feeling is just beginning to become real and a little scary. I don’t want to leave all of my amazing friends but I am also so excited and ready to head to my first ship. It is such a strange feeling and is very hard to explain.

 

Billet Night was an incredible night full of excitement and memories. I will be headed to CGC Legare, a 270-foot cutter home-ported in Portsmouth, Virginia! I am beyond excited to report aboard and be given the opportunity to carry out the missions of the Coast Guard. It will be a challenging two years full of learning but I am so ready to perform to my highest potential and serve this great organization well.

 

Another awesome event for the Class of 2015 this past month was Castle Dance. This is the 1/c formal held at a castle in Newport, Rhode Island. It was a very classy night with a lot of dancing and fun with my classmates. Additionally, it was nice to wear a dress and be able to have my hair down for this formal event.

 

Last weekend was Easter and a group of us went to my friend Carolyn’s house in upstate New York. Her family was so welcoming and made our Easter weekend so incredibly special. It is so nice to be able to get a home-cooked meal and feel like a part of a family when your own is so far away.

 

One of the things that I cherish most about the Academy is the lifelong friends and family you make in just four short years. I did not ever imagine myself being fortunate enough to be a part of so many families and it is so nice to have constant support from so many wonderful people.

 

I hope spring has sprung for many of you reading this and that warmer weather starts making its way up here soon.

 

More about Sara.

 

Finding Your Focus

(Academics, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Johnson Photo Another year and another semester, and would you look at that, I’m almost halfway to graduating from the Academy. It seems like only yesterday that I was telling my friend in English class during my senior year of high school that I was going to visit the Coast Guard Academy and I really wanted to attend school there. It feels like I have accomplished so much in the little time since graduating high school. Trust me on this; time goes by quickly when you have something you’re working your heart out for.

 

I know I didn’t write much my first semester as a sophomore at the Academy, but I can definitely say there wasn’t much going on. First semester was pretty much me buckling down on school and military performance. I had heard advice from senior ranking officers that sophomore year is a great year to pick a focus; for example, if you didn’t work out very much and cadre summer is coming up, you should work out to be fit for training the incoming swabs, or if you lacked in grades, focus on that a bit more because there isn’t an overload of responsibility as a 3/c. Don’t get me wrong, there are still responsibilities like being the role model to the freshmen, but there isn’t as much as, say, a junior that is in charge of the development of the 4/c. Last semester my intent was to work on military performance. I wanted to be able to teach the 4/c things that I wished my 3/c taught me last year about the Academy in all aspects.

 

Now that I worked on that, I earned my first Silver Star! By the way, the Silver Star is similar to an award for being in the top 25% of military excellence for that semester. It was extremely exciting. Now this semester, I am working on my academics a little more. So far, it’s been much better than last semester. My first three quizzes in Differential Equations have all been 80-90%.

 

Hope all is going well and if you have any questions, feel free to email me at AngelaRuth.A.Johnson@uscga.edu!

 

More about Angela.

 

The Importance of Shipmates

(Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Fruhwirth Photo Winter leave. Possibly the greatest two words I have ever heard. First semester finished, finals completed, and halfway through one of the most challenging years of my life. Two weeks to finally go home, reconnect with my family and high school friends, and momentarily forget about all the stressors the Academy brings. Coming back was definitely one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. I wanted more than anything to sign those drop papers and join my friends at a civilian school, having fun for the next four years and living a somewhat carefree life. This past week has been difficult, no longer home with my friends and back to waking up every morning before the sun. I wouldn’t be able to be doing this if it weren’t for my shipmates. The greatest part of this school is the bond you make with everyone here. We pick each other up, we have each other’s back, we look out for everyone—we’re a team. My shipmates have made me laugh and reminded me to keep a positive attitude and focus on all of the great things coming to us at the end of this semester—such as boards (carry-on!!!) and our summer trainings. Though it is difficult right now and might get worse before it gets better, the important part is that it will get better and I know I will always have people in my corner cheering me on regardless of the circumstances.

 

More about Ainsley.

 

Parents' Weekend: A Deeper Meaning

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Ritchie Photo The atmosphere of the Academy changes immensely when everyone’s families are here. Cadets and their family members all wear ear-to-ear grins; they’re overjoyed to see each other. We often talk about the strong support network that cadets have, but it’s really something to see it. Families come from all over the country, and some from other countries, for Parents’ Weekend. Cadets whose parents can’t come are taken in by other families so they’re not alone. We become one big Coast Guard family instead of 1,000 individual ones.

 

This year, I noticed a huge difference in myself from last Parent’s Weekend. As a 3/c, I’m more confident and comfortable here and less reliant on my parents’ support. Every time my parents left after visiting last year, I cried. This year, it’s was a “see you next time!” and no tears. (Don’t get me wrong, I still need and appreciate all the support my parents give me, but I’m also a lot more independent.) Also, this year, I spent as much time as I could enjoying my mom’s company instead of worrying about homework and indoc all weekend. I didn’t even bring any homework with me to the hotel. I had a lot to do Sunday night, but I don’t regret it.

 

I could see how nervous some 4/c parents were because they didn’t know what to expect or were almost discomforted by the amount their sons and daughters had changed and grown up. For some, it was the first time they’d seen each other since R-Day. With those nerves comes pride. It is wonderful to see how proud each and every parent is of his or her cadet. My mom has a shirt that says, “Some people never meet their heroes… I raised mine.” I know that a lot of other parents feel the same way. You can see it in their smiles and feel it in their hugs. I found it heartwarming when I saw a cadet holding their parents’ hands like she was still their little girl. It’s those signs of love and support that give Parents’ Weekend a much deeper meaning.

 

More about Sarah.

 

Always on Your Toes

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Auzenbergs Photo I have caught myself calling Chase Hall “home” more and more often now. It worried me at first, until I realized that it just means that I’m actually getting into the hang of things here, and this doesn’t just feel like some extended AIM week anymore! It’s been hard for me to realize that this is my life for the next four years. Monday and Friday morning drill practice, early morning military trainings before class, the long school days, and busy nights of homework just seem like a test that I have to pass to get back home. (In this case, home being my high school in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts). But that is not the case! This is home now, and it’s becoming more evident every week. I find myself stressing with my roommate about things that I know my friends at UMASS will never encounter, like if we buffed our floor enough, if our beds are wrinkled when we wake up in the morning, or if our blinds are secured before we leave the room. Then we laugh hysterically when we’re walking down the ladder wells in Chase and we see another 4/c do a spin move in the corner instead of squaring, risking demerits just for the fun of it, or when we see someone wait an extra 30 seconds in their doorway before exiting for an upper class to walk by, just to avoid having to greet them in the hallway. Now if I came back from a soccer game at a civilian college, I wouldn’t have to think twice about the transition from laughing and joking with the team outside the dorm, to opening the door, squaring the corner, and locking my eyes in the boat. The little things that make the Academy unique and fun are starting to become more evident and unite us even more.

 

However, life can’t get too comfortable here at the Academy! Teachers start planning for midterms which are quickly approaching, Cadet Evaluation Reports (CERs) are due, the first military testing period opens up, and to add onto it all, I tore my ACL and meniscus during a soccer game. Now there is another stressor to deal with that seems like it will be much harder to get used to. Luckily, the support here is better than anywhere else I can imagine. My roommate has been more than helpful, my shipmates are even more supportive than they already were, and my teachers are very understanding about arriving a few minutes late to class due to the painstakingly slow speed of crutching, or with making up missed work because of doctor’s appointments, surgery and PT visits. (But sadly it doesn’t make it easier to get from Satterlee to Smith in a reasonable time!) So, now this month and a few weeks beyond will be spent trying to adjust to another challenge that I will hopefully adapt to just as quickly as the others – the Academy on crutches.

 

More about Gabrielle.