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cadet blogs

Mr. Friedman Visit

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Stowes Photo Hey, CGA blog readers! It is almost spring break time here and that means a flurry of trainings, corps-wide lectures, and, most dreaded, midterms! Despite everything on our plates as we approach break, spirits have been pretty high at the Academy. This past week, we had health and wellness week, so we got to try out some awesome smoothies in the wardroom, sleep in a few days, and we even had a dodge ball tournament. Also, the fourth class are starting to take Boards, their cumulative indoctrination test, and many of them passed on the first time around!

 

With everything going on, I could write forever. However, I will focus on one day that I thought was very interesting. Mr. Thomas Friedman, an internationally renowned columnist for the New York Times, came to the Academy to give a lecture. Mr. Friedman has written six books, mainly about globalization, which is the increasing inter-connectedness of world affairs. He is a very engaging man and his writing provokes you to think about how technology is bringing the world closer together than ever before. If you haven’t read his work, I recommend skimming some reviews on the internet because it is definitely worthwhile.

 

During Mr. Friedman’s visit, I had the pleasure of sitting in on an exclusive lecture for some government majors. During that class, I was really impressed with Mr. Friedman’s work, his character, and humor. His public speaking and writing are presented in a manner that anyone can understand and he is very in touch with his audience.

 

After the class, I had the privilege of leading Mr. Friedman on a tour of our barracks. Needless to say, I was very nervous. I spent most of the morning before the tour familiarizing myself with his work, because I anticipated having to answer questions about what he had written. However, Mr. Friedman was more interested in learning about the Academy and the cadet experience. Like many of our visitors, he was not intimately familiar with what the Coast Guard does and he didn’t know much about the Academy. It was a pleasure leading him around the barracks, discussing cadet life, our opportunities, and mission. He was very attentive and interested in learning everything. I hope he will write a column about us!

 

During the evening, the corps gathered in Leamy to hear Mr. Friedman speak. I was drawn in by his presentation, and it made me think a lot about the United States’ role in the future and how the Coast Guard will factor into the accelerating pace of globalization. The cadet reaction to Mr. Friedman was impressive. Cadets, even non-government majors, seemed to like his lecture.

 

I am so thankful that I go to the Academy because I realize that we have outstanding opportunities here. The Academy does a great job developing us into well rounded officers, with knowledge in issues outside of our majors, and, as always, the Academy is dedicated to molding us into the officers of the future.

 

If you want to know more or have any questions about my previous blogs, please feel free to email me at Hunter.D.Stowes@uscga.edu.

 

I wish the best to applicants, prospective cadets, and parents!

 

More about Hunter.

 

Finding Your Focus

(Academics, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Johnson Photo Another year and another semester, and would you look at that, I’m almost halfway to graduating from the Academy. It seems like only yesterday that I was telling my friend in English class during my senior year of high school that I was going to visit the Coast Guard Academy and I really wanted to attend school there. It feels like I have accomplished so much in the little time since graduating high school. Trust me on this; time goes by quickly when you have something you’re working your heart out for.

 

I know I didn’t write much my first semester as a sophomore at the Academy, but I can definitely say there wasn’t much going on. First semester was pretty much me buckling down on school and military performance. I had heard advice from senior ranking officers that sophomore year is a great year to pick a focus; for example, if you didn’t work out very much and cadre summer is coming up, you should work out to be fit for training the incoming swabs, or if you lacked in grades, focus on that a bit more because there isn’t an overload of responsibility as a 3/c. Don’t get me wrong, there are still responsibilities like being the role model to the freshmen, but there isn’t as much as, say, a junior that is in charge of the development of the 4/c. Last semester my intent was to work on military performance. I wanted to be able to teach the 4/c things that I wished my 3/c taught me last year about the Academy in all aspects.

 

Now that I worked on that, I earned my first Silver Star! By the way, the Silver Star is similar to an award for being in the top 25% of military excellence for that semester. It was extremely exciting. Now this semester, I am working on my academics a little more. So far, it’s been much better than last semester. My first three quizzes in Differential Equations have all been 80-90%.

 

Hope all is going well and if you have any questions, feel free to email me at AngelaRuth.A.Johnson@uscga.edu!

 

More about Angela.

 

January Snow and the Most Memorable Diving Meet

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Cantrell Photo The month of January was filled with snow! Really only the last week, but it was enough for a whole season. Every time I see the huge piles of snow I wish it could be sand. I guess it’s because I am a Florida girl at heart. We had a normal day of school on Monday, but by Monday afternoon the snow had started. It was beautiful to see the flakes falling down, but then it started sticking and it got scary to walk around base. It looked like I was learning how to walk because I was so scared I would slip on ice.

 

Storm Juno gave us two days off of school mid week, which was a great surprise. It was also the first time I’ve shoveled snow. Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t want to shovel a long driveway, but shoveling out my car with my friend Carolyn was pretty fun. It also wasn’t as bad as I thought.

 

Other than this month bringing storm Juno, the schoolwork is in full swing. I had my first paper due this past week and have my first test in a couple of days. Quizzes and homework are regular tasks.

 

We also had our last home meet ever. It was against The Merchant Marine Academy, which is our biggest rival. It was an amazing meet and will be my most memorable meet of my diving career.

 

More about Sara.

 

My New Major...Management

(Academics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Glick Photo As Winter Storm Juno hits New England, I finally get a chance to catch up on my cadet blogs. School was cancelled Tuesday and Wednesday, which was a nice break in the routine. January flew by, and starting next week it will be February! This semester for me so far hasn’t been as stressful as the last, as I am taking four less credit hours, and I am already adjusted to the duties of a 3/c cadet. I am excited to take classes in my new major, Management, like Financial Accounting and Organizational Behavior and Leadership. Financial Accounting has been a bit of a struggle for us all, but that’s just because it’s something most of us have never learned. I switched my major to Management because I wanted to learn about how the Coast Guard efficiently manages manpower, materials, and money. I am interested in a Human Resources ashore career between afloat assignments, and I think I can make a difference in how Coast Guard command cadre relates to its people through its Human Resources Directorate.

 

Watching workers complete the Academy-wide slate re-roofing project, I thought about my roots. I was born to a working class family and my community has given me an opportunity to attend college, a federal service academy at that. I am excited to learn the ins and outs of management today so that one day I can make a difference in the lives of Coast Guardsmen around the world. Pretty idealistic, so I better get to studying for my Physics II test tomorrow.

 

More about William.

 

Round 2

(Academics, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Chang Photo The last time I wrote one of these blogs, I was looking forward to going home for Columbus Day. I was a fourth class cadet, full of hope and motivation. Now, however... nothing’s changed. First semester was definitely something else. One class in particular, Statics and Engineering Design (SED), was especially the bane of my existence. This class had no mercy and proved to be a formidable course that would eventually drive me, as well as many of my shipmates, to the brink of madness. The only reason I got off that class with a C+ is because of the help of instructors and shipmates. Going to tutoring sessions and dragging a buddy to come with you is a great way to study. In fact, the mutual suffering brings you closer. Seriously though, studying with a friend is one of the best ways to learn. You teach each other, correct each other, and may even find new ways to think. This is one of the great things at the Academy; everyone’s a student, but, at the same time, everyone’s a teacher.

 

Now that first semester is over, we’re in MAP week. This is when everyone returns to the Academy and prepares for the next semester. Despite classes not being in session yet, it’s a pretty busy week because of things such as class scheduling, roommate switches and almost falling asleep during trainings. The busiest day was Wednesday, when the Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Paul Zukunft came and addressed the Corps of Cadets. He talked about leadership, the Coast Guard’s future plans and even handed out a few sea stories. I think everyone took something from his words, and whatever they take will show in how they do in the semester.

 

More about Olivia.