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cadet blogs

Best Summer of My Cadet Career

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Pourmonir PhotoJune

 

As school came to an end, summer came swiftly and undetected. One minute I was studying for finals and the next I was getting yelled at. Let me preface this entry with an explanation of what one’s 2/c summer is like. First, you experience 100th Week. That is an entire week devoted to training you for your upcoming duty of training the incoming class of cadets. The rest of your summer might vary from your classmates a little in scheduling but it will be similar in that you will all be entering what will most likely be the most exciting summer of your life. You spend a week shooting to qualify in pistol at the range, a week taking the Rules of the Road class, a week on training vessels practicing your new found knowledge, a week at a Coast Guard air station, and two weeks sailing up the coast. Now with a better understanding of what my summer entailed, let me bring your attention back to 100th Week. They brought in the Cape May Company Commanders to instruct us 2/c cadets on how best to train, develop, and prepare the incoming swabs to become cadets at the Coast Guard Academy. These company commanders spend every day training the men and women who enlist in the Coast Guard. The trainees that leave Cape May go on to become rescue swimmers, saving lives of those lost at sea, or assume the another duty required to be filled in the enlisted workforce. The company commanders spent the week yelling at us for our discrepancies, making us sweat until we dropped, and ensuring we understood the real purpose of training incoming members of the military. They showed us how vital our role was in the success of the swabs. They taught us that Swab Summer is not about yelling and push-ups, but about creating individuals that will stand by us after graduation and defend the constitution with honor, respect, and a devotion to their duties. This lesson will get me through the rest of my time in the Coast Guard, and well beyond. It was just the beginning of definitely the best summer of my cadet career.

 

July

 

My cadre experience, training the Class of 2019, was one of the hardest and most rewarding things I have ever been through. The training environment was stressful and demanding, but the outcome was worthwhile. Day to day as a class we were responsible for teaching the swabs how to thrive in a military environment. From day one, their hair was cut and their uniforms were issued, and from an outsider’s perspective they might have seemed like trained military members. The true task at hand was to make them understand the importance of our core values. It was to connect them with the spirit of our mission; to challenge them to make their bodies sounder, their hearts stouter, and their minds more alert. We were expected to teach them initiative and leadership skills by meeting adversity head-on, and providing them with a valuable experience in their development as future leaders. They had to prove that they are worthy of the traditions of commissioned officers in the Coast Guard. Being a part of a process that prepares people to save lives and defend our constitution was more rewarding then I could have imagined. With our 35 incoming swabs, we spent a lot of time explaining the basics. Throughout the summer, I quickly realized that I learned more from my trainees than I could ever teach them. Their positive attitudes and determination made this cadre experience better than I could have imagined.

 

August

 

The paramount experience of my summer was definitely the Coastal Sail Training Program. I was placed on a boat with six of my classmates and a safety officer. I was given eight days to learn how to sail, how to work with my classmates, and how to lead my peers. This may sound easy but the journey proved to be a lot more difficult than I thought. My cadre section dealt with sailing all summer, so we knew the basics of sailing. The leading proved to be more stressful than I had expected. Everyone has a different leadership style, so learning to follow different leaders involves dedication and effective communication. I created a bond with my classmates that will get me through my time here at the Academy. I made friends that will last a lifetime, and as a team we were recognized for being the most intrepid sailors on the trip. As fearless and daring sailors, we returned to the Academy with a new found confidence and trust in each other that I will never forget.

 

More about Keemiya.

 

Summer in Three Parts

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Ellis Photo Hi everyone.

I just wanted to give you all an update on what I did during my final summer here at the Academy. My summer was broken into three parts: first was Inter-Collegiate Sailing Nationals, second was my time on an 87’ cutter, and third was an internship at the District One office in Boston, Massachusetts.

 

Sailing: Once again, the dinghy team qualified for both Women’s and Coed Sailing Nationals. We competed against teams from all across the country, including Yale, Stanford, and College of Charleston. I stayed and competed for Women’s Nationals, which was held at the end of May in Newport, Rhode Island. It was extremely windy, and with our light team, we did not do as well as we had hoped, finishing 11th in the country. I left for my 87’ cutter, based out of the Naval Station in Newport, after this event. The Coed Nationals were held the week after I left. The coed team placed 2nd out of the entire country, a huge accomplishment not only for the team that was there, but also for those who were already at their summer assignments. We are super excited about this finish and hope to do just as well, if not better, at Nationals next year!

 

CGC Tiger Shark: After Women’s Nationals, I headed straight to my cutter, which wasn’t a far drive since the competition’s location was right next to my cutter. I spent two weeks aboard the CGC Tiger Shark in Newport, Rhode Island. While there, I got to see a few fisheries being boarded, as well as meet and spend time with the crew and learn about life aboard a Coast Guard cutter. I realized that I really like the small cutter atmosphere and I would love to go on a smaller cutter next year.

 

District One Internship: For the third part of my summer, I spent six weeks at an internship at the District One Office in Boston, Massachusetts. Here, I spent my time using the Geographic Information System (GIS), a spatial mapping program, to create oil response plans for the entire Hudson River. I spent half of my internship in Boston, while the other half was spent traveling down 100 miles of the Hudson River. While there, I presented my project to both the District One commander and the Atlantic Area commander, which was a really awesome experience. I learned a lot during my internship about oil spill response, the CG’s role in response and how the CG works with other agencies to achieve common goals.

 

Overall, I had a really productive summer. I learned a lot and got much accomplished. I’m so glad that the CG gave me some pretty awesome opportunities this summer.

 

More about Kayla.